Highline History

Highline Train Station went into service at 12:45 p.m. on Sunday, February 7, 1909 as passenger train No. 6 pulled up at the station with Jacob Talhelm as engineer and Jacob Stouffer as conductor. Nearly 500 people stood along the track cheering. When the station opened, there were seven round trip passenger trains daily between Hagerstown and Harrisburg. Each morning commuters went to nearby towns, Philadelphia, and New York.

In February of 1936, the last local train passed along Carlisle Street, and this track was abandoned. Following World War II and the significant increase in automobile travel, the passenger trains were gradually removed from service and the station and grounds fell into decay.

In 1960, Greencastle Boy Scout Troops 13 and 99 were in need of a regular meeting place and became interested in the passenger station as a possible solution to their problem. Since the station became the scout headquarters, there has been a lot of effort by both girl and boy scout troops on improving the appearance of the building.

Highline Grand Opening

A GRAND OPENING

The new station went into service at 12:45 p.m. on Sunday, February 7, 1909 as passenger train No. 6 pulled up at the station to a cheering crowd of nearly 500.

Highline Grand Opening

STATION ENTRANCE

Commuters entered the station via a winding walk that led up the hill from Baltimore Street.

Highline Grand Opening

PASSENGER STATION

There were seven round trip passenger trains daily between Hagerstown and Harrisburg, as well as trips to nearby towns and larger cities.

Highline Grand Opening

GREENCASTLE AND THE RAILROAD

For a consideration of $10,000, Greencastle's borough council granted the Railroad permission to build a “highline” west of Jefferson Street.

Highline Grand Opening

HISTORIC DISTRICT

As of today, the passenger station remains part of the Greencastle Historic District.

Highline Grand Opening

THE END OF AN ERA

In February of 1936, the last local train passed along Carlisle Street, and this track was abandoned.